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SDG 01 - End Poverty

SDG 1-5

SDG 01 - End Poverty

Pay tax and royalties

Facilitate equitable access to employment

Offer training and apprenticeship programs

Develop local supplier capacity and Strengthen local value chains

Preserve land access (including resettled communities)


Mining and exploration activities can quickly create perverse impacts as giving temporary wealth to poor agri-communities. Among the consequences, this can tend to destabilize the local economy with short term work perspectives for the youngest. SDG's  should see as a guide to initiate sustainable solutions which can last far beyond a mine operation closure.

Mining contributes to eradicating poverty through tax and royalty payments that allow the development of basic public goods, such as access to health, housing, education and infrastructure. Mining can also help reduce poverty through job creation, induced economic activity and the provision of basic services. Finally, to avoid the risk of exacerbating poverty, mining operations must have effective strategies to restore livelihoods that might be adversely affected by mining, including ensuring access to land and natural resources for people in mining communities.
Companies should especially consider their impact on children, who are often overlooked, yet can be particularly vulnerable physically and economically.

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SDG 02 - Zero Hunger

SDG 1-5

SDG 02 - Zero Hunger

Explore synergies with agriculture (geochemistry, water resources, land take, infrastructure sharing)

Keep farmland pollution-free (environmental monitoring)

 


Where mining companies operate in traditionally agricultural areas, the impact of mining on water, land and biodiversity resources is a concern to farmers and indigenous peoples and can therefore be a potential source of social conflict. Mining companies also frequently operate in areas with chronic malnutrition, especially among children. Companies can contribute to SDG2 by managing their impacts on natural resources and collaborating to eliminate hunger and improve agricultural production and sustainability.

 

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SDG 03 - Good Health and Well-Being

SDG 1-5

SDG 03 - Good Health and Well-Being

Champion occupationnal health and safety

Offer and encourage preventive care

Combat Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS

Increase mental health awarness

 


The potential health risks associated with mining pose significant challenges for advancing SDG3. These include occupational hazards and increased risk factors for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases (e.g. particulate air pollution), tuberculosis (e.g. silica dust exposure), HIV/AIDS (e.g. unsafe sex and prostitution), mental illness, substance abuse and domestic violence (e.g. split lifestyles from fly-in/fly-out, month-on/monthoff work schedules). Mining also can occur in areas that are particularly vulnerable to tropical diseases like malaria, and the mine-related in-migration of labour can also pose health risks, especially to children and women, exposing them to sexual exploitation, violence, pregnancy, drugs and alcohol abuse. Mining companies have substantial commitments and policies for health and safety to pre-emptively address risk factors. Mining companies can also collaborate with government and other stakeholders to bring health services to areas that lack them

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